A Doorway to a Bigger World: Part 1: Independence

 

Open Your Mind Quote

Reading is where the impossible becomes possible, which is always an uplifting thought. Books are universal, for any level, covering any theme, evoking laughter or tears and being translated into any language. The opportunity to read is not limited by class or race but simply by the access given to reading material. However, should that really be an obstacle? Many books can be borrowed from libraries or schools or be downloaded free of charge, so really there is no excuse. Any child can find the books they love with a little help.

It has been proven that reading is the number one foundation for a very good start in life and with so many benefits to be gained with so little effort, why wouldn’t we encourage them? In doing so you are opening doors of opportunity for them and feeding their independence, laughter and imagination, something I always try to bear in mind with my own writing.

In this three part series of blogs I will expand on how reading helps develop each of these three traits opening a doorway to a bigger world.

INDEPENDENCE

“The more you read the more things you will know. The more that you learn the more places you’ll go”. Dr Seuss

“Books were my pass to personal freedom. I learned to read at age three, and soon discovered there was a whole world to conquer that went beyond our farm in Mississippi”. Oprah Winfrey

Reading is amongst one of the first things children learn to do independently. Independence is confidence in who they are. To be able to read enables their individual mindset to grow and develop the power to make unique choices. So what are the aspects of reading that inspire independence in children?

  1. Clever stories can prepare children for real life events, such as what it’s like to go to school, that learning to swim can take practise etc. Even a small insight into how it might go could give them the confidence to give it a try themselves.
  2. Reading encourages children to think for themselves by learning to question things and determine what is reality and what is fantasy. Can a mouse really dance? Do aliens wear underpants?
  3. By questioning the story they start forming their own perceptions and opinions, from the type of book or magazine they want to read, through to the information they choose to accept or discard from each one.
  4. Each book is an experience which offers them the freedom to acquire new knowledge and ideas that they might otherwise never gain access to.
  5. Reading builds up a child’s vocabulary which can give them the confidence to speak out and explain their own individual thoughts.

Watch out for “A Doorway to a Bigger World: Part 2: Laughter”.

 

 

 

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